Journal of Extension Systems

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2013, Volume 29(2), December

EDITORIAL, Fabio M. SANTUCCI

  1. Information sources used and extension methods preferred by dairy farmers, Ismet BOZ & Dilek Bostan BUDAK
  2. Application of information and communication technologies in agriculture by extension personnel, S.R. VERMA & F.L. SHARMA
  3. How to improve the sustainability of approaches for management advice for family farms in Africa? Towards a research and development agenda, Guy FAURE, Aurelie TOILLIER, Anne LEGILE, Ismail MOUMOUNI, Vital PELON, Pascal GOUTON, & Marc GANSONRE
  4. Adoption of inorganic insecticides and resistant varieties among cowpea producers in Mubi Zone, Nigeria , Elisabeth SABO, R.M. SAN, R.M. BASHIR, & O.T. ADENIJI
  5. Gender and household roles: implications for extension services , Franklin E. NLERUM
  6. Strengthening leadership programs through collaborative efforts of cooperative extension and research faculty , Jane WALKER, Benjamin GRAY, Martha A. WALKER, & Terrence THOMAS
  7. News, Views, and Reviews: Healthcare Consciousness with Herbs, Om S. Verma

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Editorial

In the last 18 months, since I was appointed in March 2012, I have received very many papers. Most of them come from India and Nigeria. Authors from other countries are beginning to appear, thanks to our continuous efforts for finding interesting papers. Four papers have been published in the June 2012 issue, together with papers already approved by my predecessor Prof. Jim Phelan, nine papers were published in the December 2012 issue and eight papers appeared in the June 2013 issue.

All the papers were first evaluated by me, and then the best ones went through the scrutiny of two Governors and Reviewers, all international experts and University professors whom I wish to thank, because they have devoted their time, pro-bono, for the improvement of this Journal and for the enhancement of agricultural extension worldwide.

We are still in the process of having the Journal recognized by 1ST Thomson. This could lead later on to the attribution of an Impact Factor to JES and it could consequently improve its attractiveness for Authors within the Academia. For reaching this goal, the Governors and I personally have been very selective in the processing of the incoming proposals.

I bear the responsibility of having rejected many papers, because they were out of scope, too superficial, and sometimes largely copied. Several articles have been rejected for the same reasons by both Governors in charge of their evaluation. All Authors have received the motivations of our decisions. Major revisions have been asked from several Authors; and many articles are today at various stages of review. Our objective is to support and guide the Authors to improve their papers.

To avoid the submission of very poor papers and to avoid wasting time of Governors and external Reviewers, all of whom are very busy in their field of work, ,a submission fee has been introduced some months ago, that must accompany each proposal. This has helped to reduce the flow of very weak and not sufficiently elaborated papers.

Prof. Fabio M. SANTUCCI
Academic Editor

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Information sources used and extension methods preferred by dairy farmers.

Ismet BOZ, Dilek Bostan BUDAK
Email: ismet.boz@omu.edu.tr

The primary purpose of this study was to determine the information sources used and the extension methods preferred by dairy farmers operating in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) of Turkey. A stratified random sample of 160 dairy farmers based on the number of dairy caws was selected from the region. Results show that as the number of dairy caws owned by farmers goes up, they tend to acquire less information from traditional sources such as family members and other farmers, and acquire more information from extension service and private veterinarians. Large farmers are more likely to adopt technology and to sustain in the changing production and marketing conditions, whereas small ones will require alternative policies to be viable.

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Application of information and communication technologies in agriculture by extension personnel.

S.R. VERMA, F.L. SHARMA
Email: verma.vermasr@gmail.com

Information and communication technology (ICT) can modernize agriculture extension systems of India and ICT cam play an important role for improving the quality life of farmers. Looking at the importance and scope of ICT application in agriculture, the present study was carried out in Udaipur district of Rajasthan state. A total of 160 extension personnel (80 from Governmental Organizations and 80 from NGOs) were selected. To investigate ICT application in agriculture, five commonly used ICT tools, namely, computer, Internet, mobile phone, kisan call center and information kiosks were selected. Data were collected through face to face interviews with the help of a developed instrument. The findings of the study show that application of computer, Internet and mobile phone is higher by the NGOs personnel than by GO personnel. Whereas, the uses of kisan call center and information kiosks by GO and NGOs personnel are almost the same in the study.

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How to improve the sustainability of approaches for management advice for family farms in Africa? Towards a research and development agenda.

Guy FAURE, Aurelie TOILLIER, Anne LEGILE, Ismail MOUMOUNI, Vital PELON, Pascal GOUTON, Marc GANSONRE
Email: guy.faure@cirad.fr

A plurality of forms of advisory services provided by a variety of actors has recently grown in Francophone Africa. In this context, experiments in MAFF (Management Advice for Family Farms) conducted in many Francophone African countries have sought to promote advice to farmers based on learning methods by using farm management tools. Questions now arise on the scaling up of these experiences and their institutional and financial sustainability. In order to draw out lessons from past, stakeholders from various countries were asked to carry out a reflexive and collective assessment of their MAFF mechanism, regarding governance, funding, methods and capacity building issues. The results have been shared during a workshop held in 2012 in Benin. The results show diversity in governance mechanisms of MAFF. Most often, POs (Producers Organization) play a central role in the implementation of advisory services. Financial contributions from farmers and their POs are still low but promising funding possibilities do exist. Many difficulties are due to a lack of well trained advisors related to poor national specific training programs for advisors. Farmer and extension workers appear as a key issue for scaling-up advisory services. However, innovation in advising methods and knowledge production about MAFF impacts are required.

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Adoption of inorganic insecticides and resistant varieties among cowpea producers in Mubi Zone, Nigeria.

Email: elikwabe@yahoo.com

Cowpea production is presently mainly managed with inorganic insecticides, but the growing environmental problems linked with their use and the rising costs of the chemicals are stimulating all categories of stakeholders towards the adoption of less impacting practices. 611 respondents were interviewed between 2008 and 2009. Respondents are young adult and fairly educated. Awareness is high about insecticide use, but it is low for biopesticides and resistant varieties. Adoption of inorganic insecticides is related to age, educational level, and contacts with dealers. Low adoption rate for resistant varieties is associated with inadequate information and poor extension service. To adopt IPM techniques with limited health hazards and compatible with the environment, a properly designed extension program is consequently needed.

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Gender and household roles: implications for extension services.

Franklin E. NLERUM
Email: frankezi@yahoo.com

The study is on gender and rural household roles. It was carried out in Akuku-Toru Local Government Area of Rivers State, Nigeria. An interview schedule administered by random sampling to 60 men and 60 women to have a sample size of 120 respondents was used for data collection. Data analyses were achieved with frequency, percentage and t-test. Out of the 21 household tasks analyzed, men perform them more than women in 12 cases. The test of hypothesis shows no significant difference between the roles of men and women. The role most frequently performed by men is the participation in fishing activities with 96.7%, while household marketing with 100% is the task most performed by women. The highest constraint to the roles attained by men is the poor access to extension service with 41.7%, whereas 93.3% of women suffer from the lack of control over their personal finances. Men should be giving more access to extension service, while women should be allowed the liberty to control their personal finances.

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Strengthening leadership programs through collaborative efforts of cooperative extension and research faculty.

Jane WALKER, Benjamin GRAY, Martha A. WALKER, Terrence THOMAS
Email: grayb@ncat.edu

There is an ongoing need for community leadership development programs particularly in rural communities. Cooperative Extension leadership programs have focused on building leadership skills to enhance the capacity of communities to address the challenges of the postmodern era and the demands of a globalized world. To justify the resources needed to meet the leadership development needs, extension must demonstrate the effectiveness of leadership development programs. The Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI) developed by researchers at North Carolina A&T State University in collaboration with Virginia Polytechnic Institute State University will provide extension practitioners with a valid and reliable instrument to assess the performance of leadership development programs.

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NEWS, VIEWS AND REVIEWS: YOU CAN USE.

O.S. Verma

This is 8th instalment in the series of Articles on Healthcare Consciousness. Live healthy the Herbal Way. Herbs are highly prized not just for their aroma and flavour but for their healing and medicinal properties. Herbs are also known to purify the air we breathe. Therefore, bring herbs to your home to make a significant difference in your home-made dishes. These days, you get a whole lot of fresh herbs easily available in most markets affordable. Once you acquire the taste and skill to cook the herbs, dinner will become a lot more colorful. Here are 10 herbs that will not only add greenery to your home but also healthy taste to your food.

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