Journal of Extension Systems

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2011, Volume 27(2), December

O. S. Verma, Editorial

  1. Improving Future of US Cooperative Extension: A Delphi Study, Amy Harder, Scott Scheer, & Nick Place
  2. Agricultural Education and Farming Competency of Development Agents in Ethiopia: The Case of North Gondar, Degsew Melak & Workneh Negatu
  3. Farmer’s Preferences for Cooperative Services in the Aegean Region of Turkey, Cihat Gunden, Terrence Thomas, Bulent Miran, & Benjamin Gray
  4. Crop Productivity and Training Needs of Beneficiary Farmers in a Watershed Development Programmes, Shailendra Singh, V. K. Khaddar, & R.P. Ahirwar
  5. Assessment of Information Dissemination on Improved Preservation Technologies of Fisherfolk in Coastal Areas of Ogun State Nigeria, Adeyanju Agbelemonge
  6. A Quasi - Longitudinal Analysis of Agricultural Extension Services in Pakistan, Inayatullah Jan & Khalid Nawab
  7. Farmers Satisfaction with Agricultural Extension of Green River Project in Rural Niger Delta, Nigeria, F.E. Nlerum, R.P.A. Unamma, & O. Ekuankama
  8. News, Views, and Reviews: Standard Dietary Regime, Om. S. Verma

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WORLD UNIVERSITY RANKINGS

As the emphasis on higher education is increasing, the need for international comparisons is also growing. While no single comparative ranking can cover every aspect of university performance, Quacquarelli Symonds 2004-2011 methodology (popularly known as QS-methodology) is conceived to present a multi-faceted view of the Relative Strength of World Universities. The Q-S methodology is devised for the use of primary audience like prospective students and their parents, employers, research funders, governments, and universities themselves. The Q-S methodology focuses on six key aspects of university activities.

Dr. O. S. Verma
Chief Editor

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Improving the Future of U.S. Cooperative Extension: A Delphi Study, 1-10.

Dr. Amy Harder Asst. Professor
University of Florida; Gainesville, FL 32611-0540 USA
E-mail: amharder@ulf.edu

Dr. Scott Scheer, Professor and State Extension Specialist
The Ohio State University; 204 Agricultural Administration Building
2120 Fyffe Rd., Columbus, OH 43210, USA


Dr. Nick Place, Associate Professor & Associate Director
University of Maryland Extension, 1202 Symons Hall
College Park, MD USA

The purpose of this study was to develop a vision for U.S. Cooperative Extension. A Delphi panel of nationally recognized Cooperative Extension experts was developed to collect data. The 12 panelists reached consensus on a vision of Cooperative Extension. Key components of the vision statement include: cutting edge technology; power of the land-grant university; and values of collaboration, effectiveness, excellence, healthy (economies, environment, people), inclusiveness, leadership, research, partnerships, and support for employees. Cooperative Extension should examine ways to align its efforts with the vision identified from this study in order to pro-actively plan for a successful future.

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Agricultural Education and Farming Competency of Development Agents in Ethiopia: The case of North Gondar, 11-18.

Degsew Melak
Department of Rural development and Agricultural Extension
University of Gondar, Ethiopia
E-mail: degsewm@yahoo.com


Workneh Negatu
Institute of Development Research
Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia

Agricultural education is basic to the development and maintenance of competency of development agents. The purpose of this research was to explore and describe empirically the perceived competency level of agricultural development agents working in four districts of North Gondar Administrative zone. A descriptive survey type of research was conducted to determine competency level and training needs of 100 development agents in farming competency. Findings showed that development agents were slightly competent in their farming competency and they were in need of training in the use of their farming competences. Recommendations include (1) employers have to designed competence strength programs through seminars, workshops, and in-service training and (2) agricultural educators need fully implement practice-oriented training.

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Farmers’ Preferences for Cooperative Services in the Aegean Region of Turkey, 19-27.

Cihat Gunden, Terrence Thomas, Bulent Miran, & Benjamin Gray
North Carolina A&T State University, C.H. Moore Ag. Research Station
1601 E. Market St. Greensboro, NC 27411
Ege University, Department of Agricultural Economics
E-mail: twthomas@ncat.edu

The principle aim of this study is to determine farmers’ preferences and priority rankings for marketing, input procurement, credit and technical assistance services provided by agricultural development cooperatives in the Aegean region of Turkey. Data were collected from 203 farmers in six provinces of the region via face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire. A fuzzy pair-wise comparison was employed to designate the service preferences of farmers and their priority rankings for services provided to them. Cluster analysis was applied to separate farms into groups so that the differences in preferences could be determined between farm types. The results indicate that the most preferred service that cooperatives provide for farmers is marketing. Additionally, cluster analysis revealed that fruit farms prefer marketing service, while vegetable farms prefer input procurement.

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Crop Productivity and Training Needs of Beneficiary Farmers in a Watershed Development Programme, 28-34.

Singh Shailendra, Khaddar, V.K. & Ahirwar, R.P.
Departmental of Soil Science and Agriculture Chemistry
College of Agriculture, Indore, Madhya pradesh-452001
E-mail: shailendrathakurb4u@gamil.com

The study was carried out in NWDPRA Solsinda watershed in Indore district of Madhya Pradesh during 2006-07 to assess the crop productivity and to identify the training needs of beneficiary farmers. Two hundred and ten participant farmers were interviewed for the purpose. It was found that there was a significant increase in both soybean and ragi yield levels of participant farmers. The majority of respondents expressed the need to train them on in situ moisture conservation, section of specific crops and varieties, pests and disease control etc. Lack of knowledge regarding the watershed activities was the major constraint faced by the beneficiaries of the watershed development programme.

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Assessment of Information Dissemination on Improved Preservation Technologies of Fisherfolk in Coastal Areas of Ogun State Nigeria, 35-45.

Adeyanju Agbelemoge
Dept of Agricultural Extension and Rural Sociology
College of Agricultural Sciences, Ayetoro. Yewa Campus
Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago-Iwoye, Nigeria
E-mail: adeyanjuagbelemoge@yahoo.com

The study assessed information dissemination on fish preservation and processing technologies to fisherfolk in the coastal area of Ogun State, Nigeria. The study covered ten (10) villages randomly selected from the coastal area where marine and lagoon fishing activities are highly practiced. Data were collected from one hundred and twenty (120) fisherfolk selected through simple random sampling technique using structured interview schedule. Descriptive statistics such as frequency counts and percentages were used to analyze the obtained data. Also, inferential statistics such as chi-square (X^2) was used to test the stated hypotheses. The results showed respondents were aware of all preservation technologies except brining and fermentation preservation technologies and had used band still using smoking, salting and sundrying. Major source of information to fisherfolk were extension workers, contact fisherfolk and group meetings with radio. The methods used for disseminating preservation technologies were radio, home visit, group meetings and field days in descending order. However, they did not adopt the accessed information mainly for cost implications and complexity that is associated with the utilization of such technologies. The results also revealed that the socio economic characteristics of the fisherfolk did not affect the adoption of fish preservative technologies. On the other hand, extension teaching methods was significantly (X^2=83.86p<0.05) related to adoption of fish preservation technologies. It is therefore necessary to develop adequate and effective extension teaching methods that will adequately disseminate information needed to enhance the adoption of fish preservation technologies in order to minimize post-harvest losses in fish industry.

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A Quasi-Longitudinal Analysis of Agricultural Extension Services in Pakistan, 46-56.

Inayatullah Jan
Institute of Development Studies (IDS)
Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Agricultural University Peshawar
E-mail: inayat43@aup.edu.pk, inayat43@yah


Khalid Nawab
Department of Agricultural Extension Education & Communication
Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Agricultural University, Peshawar, Pakistan

The efficiency of extension systems for sustainable agriculture and rural development to ensure food security is a major policy concern for the contemporary governments and international agricultural development organizations. This study was carried out in northwest Pakistan to analyze and compare agricultural extension services in the area over a period of two decades-from 1986-87 to 2005-06. Drawing on information from six villages, the study depicted that tendency of extension workers to contact farmers has significantly been reduced in the course of time. Majority of farmers, particularly small and medium holders, noted no visits of extension workers to their farm. Thereby, farmers often relied on their traditional skills or advices from the non-technical input dealers in the local market. The study concludes that major reforms in extension system such as decentralization, effective research-extension-farmers linkages, and shift from public to private extension domains are essential to improve efficiency of extension services in Pakistan.

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Farmers Satisfaction with Agricultural Extension of Green River Project in Rural Niger Delta, Nigeria, 57-65.

Nlerum, F.E, R.P.A Unamma, & O.O. Ekumankama
Department of Agricultural Economics and Extension
Rivers State University of Science and Technology
P.M.B 5080, Port Harcourt, Nigeria
Department of Rural Sociology and Extension
Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, P.M.B. 7267
Umudike, Abia State, Nigeria
E-mail: frankezi@yahoo.com

This study compared the extent to which beneficiaries were satisfied with the implementation of the activities of Green River Project in communities of Niger Delta region of Nigeria. The stratified and random sampling methods were used in selecting a sample size of 270 beneficiaries of the Project. Data collection was done with the questionnaire. Analyses of data were achieved with means, analysis of variance and mean separation. Results indicated that, out of the 16 activities studied, Bayelsa State beneficiaries were satisfied with nine, River State followed with eight, while Imo State came last with two. Bayelsa and River States’ satisfaction varied significantly from that of Imo State beneficiaries. The study recommends higher effort of the Project that would lead to increase in satisfaction among Imo State beneficiaries.

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News, Views, and Reviews, 66-75.

Om. S. Verma
Ex-President, Indian Society of Extension Education
Chief Editor, Journal of Extension Systems
C-25/2, Kendriya Mar, Sector-38, Nerul (W)
New Bombay 400706, INDIA

This is the fourth installment in the series of Articles on Healthcare Consciousness. In earlier three Articles, eight topical items of healthcare practices have been published. This is especially confined to Standard Dietary Regime.

Research conducted by a team of Scientists led by Catherine Gale at the University of Southampton in England showed that vegetarians tend to be brighter than meat-eaters. They have higher Intelligence Quotient and get better jobs. They tend to have lower blood pressure, lower cholesterol, and are less likely to be obese. The study further reports that a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole-grains boosts a person’s Brain Power. Vegetarianism is, therefore, a best bet for living a longer, healthier, and enjoyable life. An American registered Dietician Dawn Jackson Blatner says that these days “Flexitarianism” diet is becoming more popular among the health-conscious individuals. Flexitarianism is a form of Semi-Vegetarianism in which they eat a combination of vegetables and fruits with Fish but will not eat mammals or birds. Similarly, there are people who eat only the meat of birds usually the Chickens along with vegetables. They are called “Pollotarians”. They tend to include non-fish animal products such as dairy products and eggs in their diet. Each of these categories of Eaters contains the Standard Dietary Regime as follows.

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